Youngevity Cal/Mag 100 is our favorite source of Calcium and Magnesium

CAL/MAG 100 - Optimal Bone Protection Build strong bones early in life and keep them strong for a lifetime! CAL/MAG 100 delivers 100% of the U.S. Daily Value of Calcium and Magnesium plus Vitamin D in a scientifically balanced formula that is easily absorbed by the body.
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Youngevity Cal/Mag 100 is our favorite source of Calcium and Magnesium 1
Youngevity Cal/Mag 100 is our favorite source of Calcium and Magnesium 2

Cal/Mag 100

CAL/MAG 100 – Optimal Bone Protection Build strong bones early in life and keep them strong for a lifetime!

CAL/MAG 100

Delivers 100% of the U.S. Daily Value of Calcium and Magnesium plus Vitamin D in a scientifically balanced formula that is easily absorbed by the body.

Over 80% of Americans are deficient in Calcium and Magnesium, yet people consistently overlook how important these minerals are to the body.

Calcium, such as in Cal/Mag 100 is essential for muscles to move, the heart to beat, and for strong bones, and has even been linked to an increase in how much fat the body burns and a decrease in how much fat is stored in the body.

Magnesium supports heart function and plays a role in moving nerve impulses.

Zinc supports a healthy immune system, and is vital for proper growth and development.

Magnesium and Zinc both help the body absorb Calcium. Biometics’ CAL/MAG 100 is a balanced supplement that delivers 100% of the U.S. Daily Value of Calcium, Magnesium, and Zinc in a scientifically balanced formula that is easily absorbed by the body.*

*These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.

Cal/Mat 100 Ingredients:

  • Vitamin A,
  • Vitamin C,
  • Vitamin D,
  • Calcium,
  • Magnesium,
  • Zinc,
  • Fructose,
  • Citric Acid,
  • Natural Flavors.

Many other Calcium products similar to Cal/Mag 100 are listed here.

You can also find Cal/Mag 100 at such Trusted Authority (TA) sites as DM1.US


Here is one of the best papers on Calcium, such as found in Cal/Mag 100. It’s from the Linus Pauling Institute at Oregon State University.

The website also discusses Magnesium, Zinc and other magic minerals found in Cal/Mag 100 and other Youngevity products, in other papers.

  • Calcium is a major constituent of bones and teeth and also plays an essential role as second messenger in cell-signaling pathways. Circulating calcium concentrations are tightly controlled by the parathyroid hormone (PTH) and vitamin D at the expense of the skeleton when dietary calcium intakes are inadequate. (More information)
  • The recommended dietary allowance (RDA) for calcium is 1,000 mg/day-1,200 mg/day for adults. (More information)
  • The skeleton is a reserve of calcium drawn upon to maintain normal serum calcium in case of inadequate dietary calcium. Thus, calcium sufficiency is required to maximize the attainment of peak bone mass during growth and to limit the progressive demineralization of bones later in life, which leads to osteoporosis, bone fragility, and an increased risk of fractures(More information)
  • High concentrations of calcium and oxalate in the urine are major risk factors for the formation of calcium oxalate stones in the kidneys. Because dietary calcium intake has been inversely associated with stone occurrence, it is thought that adequate calcium consumption may reduce the absorption of dietary oxalate, thus reducing urinary oxalate and kidney stone formation. (More information)
  • Data from observational studies and randomized controlled trials support calcium supplementation in reducing the risk of high blood pressure and preeclampsia in pregnant women. The World Health Organization advises that all pregnant women in areas of low calcium intake (i.e., low-income countries with intakes around 300 to 600 mg/day) be given supplemental calcium starting in the 20th week of pregnancy. (More information)
  • Prospective cohort studies have reported an association between higher calcium intakes and lower risk of developing colorectal cancer; however, large clinical trials of calcium supplementation are needed. (More information)
  • Current available data suggest that adequate calcium intakes may play a role in body weight regulation and have therapeutic benefits in the management of moderate-to-severe premenstrual symptoms. (More information)
  • Adequate calcium intake is critical for maintaining a healthy skeleton. Calcium is found in a variety of foods, including dairy products, beans, and vegetables of the kale family. Yet, content and bioavailability vary among foods, and certain drugs are known to adversely affect calcium absorption. (More information)
  • Hypercalcemia, a condition of abnormally high concentrations of calcium in blood, is usually due to malignancy or primary hyperparathyroidism. However, the use of large doses of supplemental calcium, together with absorbable alkali, increases the risk of hypercalcemia, especially in postmenopausal women. Often associated with gastrointestinal disturbances, hypercalcemia can be fatal if left untreated. (More information)
  • High calcium intakes — either from dairy foods or from supplements — have been associated with increased risks of prostate cancer and cardiovascular events in some, but not all, observational and intervention studies. However, there is currently no evidence of such detrimental effects when people consume a total of 1,000 to 1,200 mg/day of calcium (diet and supplements combined), as recommended by the Food and Nutrition Board of the Institute of Medicine. (More information)


Calcium is the most abundant mineral in the human body. About 99% of the calcium in the body is found in bones and teeth, while the other 1% is found in the blood and soft tissue. Calcium concentrations in the blood and fluid surrounding the cells (extracellular fluid) must be maintained within a narrow concentration range for normal physiological functioning. The physiological functions of calcium are so vital to survival that the body will stimulate bone resorption (demineralization) to maintain normal blood calcium concentrations when calcium intake is inadequate. Thus, adequate intake of calcium is a critical factor in maintaining a healthy skeleton (1).

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